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Logo: Institut für Quantenoptik/Leibniz Universität Hannover
Logo Leibniz Universität Hannover
Logo: Institut für Quantenoptik/Leibniz Universität Hannover
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Ultrafast Laser Applications

The unique properties of laser pulses, such as high intensity, high brightness and coherence, tunability, or ultrabroad bandwidth have fertilized many areas in engineering, chemistry, physics, and the life sciences. We employ sophisticated laser sources in selected application areas such as bio imaging or material processing. 

Spectroscopy and Imaging

 

Within the focus of an ultrafast laser linear and nonlinear interaction can be localized to a volume in the µm3 range. This high resolution is usefully employed for imaging e.g. in life sciences. Further combined with spectroscopy, sensing and ranging in the micron scale becomes reality, and methods such as CARS microscopy, OCT, FLIM, or nonlinear microscopy became standard technologies with a billion dollar marked worldwide. Here in our group we are continuously working on innovative concepts and methods for the imaging techniques of the future. More…

 

Two-Photon Polymerization

Two-photon polymerization (2PP) with few-cycle pulses is a yet unexplored regime promising the potential to shrink 2PP structures to a value considerably below the structures produced with pulses in the regime of several tens or hundreds of femtoseconds. By using few-cycle laser pulses reduced average power for the 2PP process is sufficient because of their much higher peak intensity and therefore for structuring without thermally damaging the samples at the same time. More...

 

 

 PLD

‚PLD‘ stands for Pulsed Laser Deposition. In this technique a pulsed laser beam is focused in vacuum on a material called target. If the absorbed energy is high enough the material evaporates or plasma is generated. Both processes result in a material ablation. If another material – the substrate - is placed in the direct ambience of the target the ablated material is deposited on it. The great advantage of this technique in opposite of other evaporation techniques is that a broad band of materials can be deposited in this way. More...

Waveguide Writing

Material processing of dielectric materials benefits from the exploitation of nonlinear absorption using femtosecond laser pulses. Our high repetition rate laser systems with pulse energies in the µJ level [link] enable the processing of many dielectric materials such as glasses and laser crystals. Here the focus is on the creation of laser written photonic waveguides, mainly in fused silica glass. More...

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